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Halifax clinic renamed in honor of hockey player who died of hereditary heart disease

Halifax clinic renamed in honor of hockey player who died of hereditary heart disease

A clinic at the Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre in Halifax has been renamed in honour of a teenage hockey player from Bedford, N.S., who died more than a decade ago.

Jordan Boyd died in August 2013 from complications of a hereditary heart condition. The 16-year-old collapsed on the ice during a training camp with the Acadie-Bathurst Titan of the QMJHL.

It was later determined that Jordan had an undiagnosed heart condition called arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.

The Jordan Boyd Inherited Heart Disease Clinic opened on Thursday.

“When we started this journey 10 years ago, this was never the plan,” said Stephen Boyd, Jordan’s father. “We just wanted to remember Jordan and knew we had to do something.”

The ceremony took place on Boyd’s 27th birthday.

In 2017, the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League apologized for Boyd’s death and said it was working to improve first aid protocols.

The family has also been working to raise awareness of cardiac arrest, raising $1.2 million in partnership with the QEII Foundation.

“Without a doubt, the Boyd family has made a step forward in research into inherited heart disease,” said Dr. Martin Gardner, cardiologist and founder of the clinic, in a statement.

Jordan Boyd died in August 2013 from complications of an undetected hereditary heart condition. The 16-year-old collapsed on the ice while participating in the hockey training camp for the Acadie-Bathurst Titan.

Jordan Boyd died in August 2013 from an undetected hereditary heart condition during a training camp with the Acadie-Bathurst Titan. (Bob Murphy/CBC)

The clinic provides care to families in the Maritimes who suffer from known or suspected hereditary heart conditions.

“They are a family that is passionate and has so much community support around them,” Susan Mullin, president and CEO of the QEII Foundation, said in an interview. “It’s really remarkable.”

Mullin said the family’s fundraising has resulted in expanded hours, more research and genetic screening at the clinic.

“The Jordan Boyd Inherited Heart Disease Clinic allows us to continue Jordan’s legacy, his compassion and care for others, and the promise that he will not be forgotten,” said Stephen Boyd.

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