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‘Buckets full of tears’: The four women who died at the hands of a Winnipeg serial killer | NanaimoNewsNOW

‘Buckets full of tears’: The four women who died at the hands of a Winnipeg serial killer | NanaimoNewsNOW

Rebecca Contois, 24, lived in Winnipeg but was a member of the O-Chi-Chak-Ko-Sipi First Nation, also known as Crane River. She had one daughter.

The court heard that in May 2022, a man searching for scrap metal found her partial remains in a dumpster in Skibicki’s neighborhood. More of her remains were discovered the following month at a city-run landfill.

Her family later said in a statement that the discovery had been incredibly difficult.

“We have experienced paralyzing grief. Pure devastation,” the statement said.

“I don’t think we’ve ever cried buckets of tears, painful wake-you-up-in-the-night fears, a kind of sadness we’ve never experienced before. Deep, deep sadness.”

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Morgan Beatrice Harris

Morgan Beatrice Harris, 39, was a mother of five and grandmother of one.

She lived in Winnipeg and was a member of the Long Plain First Nation.

Police suspect her remains are at another landfill, and a search will begin there this fall.

“She was crazy. She was fun. People loved being around her,” her daughter Cambria Harris said at a 2022 vigil.

Kirstin Witwicki said her cousin had a “tremendous spirit” and was fearless.

“I know she loved her children and she did the best she could with what she had,” Witwicki said.

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Marcedes Myran

Marcedes Myran, 26, also lived in Winnipeg and was a member of the Long Plain First Nation. She was the mother of two children.

Her remains are also believed to be at the Prairie Green landfill.

Angel Myran said she was pregnant when she last saw her niece, after he stroked her belly.

“She laid her head on my shoulder and I told her I loved her and missed her,” Angel Myran said in a message.

“I will cherish that memory of her forever.”

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Mashkode Bizhiki’ikwe

One victim, whom police were unable to identify, was named Mashkode Bizhiki’ikwe, or Buffalo Woman, by a group of indigenous grandmothers.

Researchers suspect she is native and in her 20s.

Her remains have not been found.

Officers seized a Baby Phat reversible jacket with her DNA on a cuff.

A ceremonial buffalo headdress symbolizing Buffalo Woman was on the prosecution’s table during Skibicki’s trial.

“We wanted her to have a name and be part of a community,” said Thelma Morrisseau, who was part of the naming ceremony for Buffalo Woman.

“She should be honored and respected.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 11, 2024.

The Canadian Press