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On this day, July 11: Aaron Burr kills Alexander Hamilton in duel

On this day, July 11: Aaron Burr kills Alexander Hamilton in duel









People line up to see “Hamilton” at the Richard Rodgers Theatre on May 4, 2016 in New York City. On July 11, 1804, U.S. Vice President Aaron Burr killed his old political enemy Alexander Hamilton, the first Secretary of the Treasury, in a duel in Weehawken, N.J. File photo by John Angelillo/UPI
On July 11, 1979, Skylab, the United States’ first space station, crashed after six years in orbit, scattering tons of debris across the Australian desert. File photo courtesy of NASA
Patrick Hannon Sr. holds a baseball signed by Baseball Hall of Fame member Babe Ruth at opening day of the St. Louis Sports Hall of Fame Bar and Grill in Maryland Heights, Mo., on March 30, 2012. Ruth made his Major League Baseball debut on July 11, 1914. File photo by Bill Greenblatt/UPI
The photo exhibit “Srebrenica, Memory for the Future” is on display at the Russell Senate Office Building in Washington, DC on June 16, 2005. On July 11, 1995, Bosnian Serbs claimed the town of Srebrenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, beginning a genocide that would result in the deaths of more than 8,000 Muslim men and boys. UPI file photo
U.S. President George W. Bush presents the Presidential Medal of Freedom to Harper Lee, author of “To Kill a Mockingbird,” in the East Room of the White House in Washington on November 5, 2007. The book was published on July 11, 1960. File photo by Roger L. Wollenberg/UPI
Newly commissioned second lieutenants celebrate as the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds fly over the 2016 U.S. Air Force Academy graduation ceremony at Falcon Stadium in Colorado Springs, Colorado, on June 2, 2016. The U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado was dedicated in 1955, with 300 cadets in its first class. File photo by Mike Kaplan/U.S. Air Force/UPI

July 11 (UPI) — On this date in history:

In 1804, U.S. Vice President Aaron Burr killed his political enemy Alexander Hamilton, the first Secretary of the Treasury, in a duel in Weehawken, New Jersey. Distant relatives of the two rivals reenacted the famous encounter on the bicentennial in 2004.

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In 1847, songwriter Stephen Foster’s first major hit, “Oh! Susanna,” was first performed in a Pittsburgh saloon. It quickly became a standard for minstrel shows.

In 1859 Charles Dickens published A tale of two cities was published.

In 1914, legendary slugger Babe Ruth made his debut in Major League Baseball. The Great Bambino would become one of the greatest baseball players of all time and was inducted into the inaugural class of the Baseball Hall of Fame.

In 1952, U.S. Army General Dwight D. Eisenhower was nominated as the Republican presidential candidate, with Richard Nixon as his running mate. They were elected that November.

In 1955, the United States Air Force Academy in Colorado opened, with 300 cadets in its first class.

In 1960 Harper Lee To kill a mockingbird was published.

In 1979, Skylab, the United States’ first space station, crashed to Earth after six years in orbit, scattering tons of debris across the Australian desert.

In 1995, the United States resumed diplomatic relations with Vietnam.

In 1995, Bosnian Serbs captured the town of Srebrenica in Bosnia and Herzegovina, beginning a genocide that would result in the deaths of more than 7,000 Muslim men and boys.

In 2006, more than 200 people were killed and another 700 injured in coordinated terrorist attacks during rush hour on public transport in Mumbai.

In 2011, an overloaded Russian cruise ship with a defective engine capsized in the Volga River during a thunderstorm and sank rapidly, killing 122 people. There were 79 survivors.

In 2015, drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman escaped from a maximum-security Mexican prison through a 5,000-foot tunnel. It was his second prison escape and he would {link:later be caught: “https://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-News/2016/01/08/Joaquin-El-Chapo-Guzman-nabbed-in-Mexico-six-months-after-prison-break/8441452277841/” data-target=”_blank”} in January 2016.

In 2019, the Japanese probe orbiting an asteroid performed a {link:second landing: “https://www.upi.com/Science_News/2019/07/11/Japans-Hayabusa-2-c ompletes-second-asteroid-touchdown-collects-another-sample/4761562848303/” data-target=”_blank”} on Ryugu.

In 2022, US President Joe Biden, in collaboration with NASA, unveiled the first image taken by the James Webb Space Telescope showing a group of galaxies.

File photo courtesy of NASA