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Bombardier aircraft assembly workers return to work after 18-day strike

Bombardier aircraft assembly workers return to work after 18-day strike
Bombardier aircraft assembly workers return to work after 18-day strike

Unifor said Wednesday that its members at Bombardier have approved a new three-year collective bargaining agreement, ending an 18-day strike at the business jet maker’s production facilities in Mississauga and Waterloo.

The new contract provides for across-the-board wage increases of 12.5 percent over the life of the deal, along with higher pension contributions and greater job security, the Canadian union said.

Bombardier also said normal assembly activities at its aircraft assembly centre in Mississauga, in the Greater Toronto Area, will resume immediately.

The 1,200 production and skilled workers who fall under Local 112, along with 250 office, skilled and technical workers represented by Local 673, work in Bombardier’s two factories to build the Global jet series.

The new contract comes weeks after the union announced a strike at Bombardier after failing to reach an agreement by a June 22 deadline.

The Montreal-based company reported annual revenue of more than $8 billion in 2023, up 16 percent from the previous year, as the pandemic fueled increased demand for private flights.

While Bombardier is keeping deliveries up as supply chain issues improve, business jet manufacturers continue to face labor shortages.

Unions across North America have been pushing for better wages and benefits that match the revenue growth companies have experienced as they ramp up operations in the wake of the post-pandemic recovery.

In July 2021, Unifor-represented members at Bombardier’s Toronto business jet assembly plant ratified a three-year contract
collective labor agreement with higher wages and pension benefits, after a week-long strike.