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Saskatchewan Health Authority AIMS pay system causing ‘fear’ among health workers, unions say

Saskatchewan Health Authority AIMS pay system causing ‘fear’ among health workers, unions say
Saskatchewan Health Authority AIMS pay system causing ‘fear’ among health workers, unions say

A multi-million dollar software system for Saskatchewan hospitals is once again causing headaches for healthcare workers, according to the Saskatchewan Union of Nurses (SUN) and SEIU-West.

The Administrative Information Management System (AIMS) is designed to manage payroll, human resources, scheduling and finances for healthcare workers across the province.

The program was scheduled to launch in November 2022, but was halted after issues including failed staff scheduling, failed time entry and other system errors came to light.

“We had an absolute disaster the first time they opened it for four days,” said Tracy Zambory, president of the Saskatchewan Union of Nurses (SUN).

For the second time, the Saskatchewan Health Authority (SHA) began using AIMS for payroll Friday. Zambory said some members reported not being paid properly, and others not at all.

“We can respect the fact that this was the second kick in the teeth, and unfortunately it has caused fear and unrest among the members,” she said.

She said the new program is not “user friendly.”

“It’s very difficult to work through. It takes a long time,” she said.

SEIU-West, which represents several types of health care workers, told CTV News its members said they weren’t adequately trained to use the system before it launched, and there have been issues with accessing payroll information, scheduling errors and problems getting supplies to the right facilities.

AIMS has been in development since 2018. The goal is to replace about 80 existing systems and improve data accuracy, according to the program’s website.

The project is expected to cost about three times its original $240 million budget, according to a December 2023 report by a county auditor.

The SHA declined to comment on the matter and instead referred CTV News to 3sHealth, the organization that oversees AIMS.

“Overall, the launch has been a success,” the organization told CTV News in a statement.

“There are a number of issues inherent in implementing large systems, but there are support teams in place to effectively handle issues related to data errors, ‘how-to’ questions and access issues.”

According to 3sHealth, less than one percent of employees did not receive a bank deposit, “which is the same percentage before AIMs.”

It was said that the system will be introduced in phases and is expected to be fully implemented by 2025.


-With files by David Prisciak