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Huron OPP reports fewer fatal accidents

Huron OPP reports fewer fatal accidents
Huron OPP reports fewer fatal accidents

If you feel like there are more police on the roads in Huron County over the past year and a half, it’s because there are more officers on the road.

“Here in Huron County, we have more resources. We have more officers, so hopefully with some additional visibility, education and enforcement by the police department, we can reduce the number of collisions in Huron County,” said Staff Sgt. Ryan Olmstead.

During the last week of June, 46 RIDE checks resulted in 330 citations for speeding, distracted and impaired driving, and not wearing a seat belt during a Huron OPP traffic safety operation.

“We started this plan last year in 2023, developing a strategy to reduce collisions. We’re pleased to announce that in 2023, we’ve had a 60 percent reduction in fatal crashes compared to 2022. So hopefully we’ll continue that trend, with a focus on the big four,” Olmstead said.

Community safety and security are the focus of the latest awareness campaign from the Huron County Community Safety and Well-Being Committee.

The year-long campaign aims to draw attention to the region’s problems and find resources to address them.

Resources such as Victim Services, a volunteer organization that helps victims of everything from car accidents to domestic violence.

A meeting of the Community Safety and Well-Being Committee for Huron County at the Huron OPP headquarters in Clinton, Ontario in June 2024. (Scott Miller/CTV News London)

“Anytime there is a victim that we can support or a survivor of a victim. So if someone has tragically passed away, their family may need help navigating the healing system and knowing where to go. We can support them in that,” said Deborah Logue, executive director of Huron-Perth Victim Services.

While police are focused on the roads, they are also drawing attention to Project Lifesaver, which helps find missing residents. Earlier this year, a missing man from Clinton was found. Also being highlighted is the CAMSAFE program, which allows businesses or homeowners with doorbell cameras or security cameras to pre-register their devices for police access in the event of a break-in or a search for suspects.

“So what we’re essentially doing is if there’s a crime or suspicious activity in the area, we’re looking at a map to see where the cameras are located. We’re then reaching out to you as the camera owner and asking if you’re willing to share your camera footage with us from this date to this date around this time so that we can hopefully solve a crime,” Olmstead said.