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Famous space behind Buckingham Palace balcony opens to public

Famous space behind Buckingham Palace balcony opens to public
Famous space behind Buckingham Palace balcony opens to public

The room behind Buckingham Palace’s famous balcony will open to the public next week, giving people a glimpse of the oriental art and furniture of Georgian monarch King George IV.

King Charles III played a major role in allowing visitors into the East Wing of the royal residence for the first time, with almost 6,000 tickets selling out within hours of going on sale in April. The bad news is that the public is not allowed onto the balcony.




Although they will have fantastic views over The Mall. PA reports that the east wing of the palace was built between 1847 and 1849 to house Queen Victoria’s growing family, and the development encompassed the former open horseshoe-shaped royal residence.

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The Centre Room at Buckingham Palace, located in the East Wing, opens onto the balcony of Buckingham Palace and overlooks the Victoria Memorial and The Mall(Image: Jonathan Brady – WPA Pool/Getty Images)

George IV’s opulent oriental-style seaside palace, the Royal Pavilion in Brighton, was sold to fund the building work. Its contents, including some of the finest ceramics and furniture in the Royal Collection, were moved to the east wing and served as inspiration for the Chinese décor of the principal rooms.

They were brought in 143 loads on artillery carts from Brighton. Some pieces were loaned to the Pavilion, but more important pieces, such as 42 fireplaces, were incorporated into Buckingham Palace, along with tables, chairs, clocks and vases.

The route of the tour

Tours of the East Wing, which also includes the palace’s state rooms, take visitors along much of the 73-metre-long main corridor and include the Yellow Salon and the central room behind the balcony.

The Yellow Drawing Room features an oriental fireplace from George’s seaside palace, an ornate gilded curtain rod and even a section of the pavilion’s wallpaper found in storage by Queen Mary and hung at her request.