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Vancouver Island cryptozoologists continue search for legendary sea serpent

Vancouver Island cryptozoologists continue search for legendary sea serpent
Vancouver Island cryptozoologists continue search for legendary sea serpent

Cadborosaurus enthusiasts are asking people to keep their eyes peeled when out on the water in the summer.

A group of cryptid enthusiasts on Vancouver Island are looking to prove the existence of a mythical sea creature and are asking people to keep their eyes peeled when they’re out on the water this summer.

Jason Walton, vice-president of the Victoria-based British Columbia Scientific Cryptozoology Club, said sightings of the Cadborosaurus, or Caddy, have been recorded since the 1930s, but stories of sea serpents in Pacific Northwest waters date back hundreds of years.

“(Sea captains) had to keep logs when they saw this (Cadborosaurus), and they weren’t going to put in a logbook, especially when there were 100 sailors on board,” Walton said. “The images of them going back to the 1700s have bodies and shapes and movements that are very similar to what people occasionally report today.”

Walton and others from the Cryptozoology Club started Caddyscan in 1999, setting up a series of cameras on the island, pointed out into the ocean, with the goal of taking photos and video of Caddy. They also began recording individual witness statements going back to the 1930s.

In the 1990s, Walton said that Caddy sightings increased. Since then, the number of sightings has declined, but he still hears of about ten sightings a year.

He described Cadborosaurus as being 6 to 9 meters long with a snake-like body. When its body comes out of the water it looks like half of a car tire sticking out of the water.

“When we see these Cadborosaurus, they move so fast and they have a neck and a head that is sometimes described as being like a camel. They have a big, bullet-like head and they’re usually very fast and short-lived,” he said. “People who have seen it say, ‘I’ve never seen anything like it in my life.’ (They) have lived on the water and are very used to all the marine life, but one description they give is that it’s prehistoric and they think, ‘What’s that doing there? It shouldn’t be there.'”

As the weather warms and more people spend time at sea, Walton is asking swimmers, sailors and boaters to be vigilant and report possible Caddy sightings to [email protected].