close
close

London ambulances launch ‘hug bags’ to help parents cope with the loss of a baby

London ambulances launch ‘hug bags’ to help parents cope with the loss of a baby
London ambulances launch ‘hug bags’ to help parents cope with the loss of a baby

Handmade bags designed to help expectant parents after a miscarriage have been rolled out by the London Ambulance Service. The knitted ‘cuddle bags’ allow relatives to hold their baby and staff to transport them to hospital in a dignified manner.

Senior paramedic Nicola Jones drew on her own experience of infant loss to launch the project with lead midwife Camella Main. The bags, made by charity Blue Lights Babies, are now included in the maternity pack on every London ambulance.




Nicola said: “I have lost a baby myself and I know many others have too. When I lost my baby I really struggled with the transition from paramedic to patient. The change left me incredibly vulnerable and I often felt very alone during the experience and when trying to come to terms with the loss.

READ MORE: Thousands of children under 5 admitted to London hospitals with breathing problems

The cuddle bags are now included in the maternity pack of every London ambulance(Image: Jason Alden/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

“When I saw the pockets, I really understood the impact they could have. I knew from a patient perspective what a difference they would make.

Camella added: “As a midwife, supporting bereaved families is a core aspect of our role. Listening to what they need at this really difficult time is essential.

“My colleagues and I have seen first-hand that giving parents time to hold their premature babies can be a crucial step in their recovery.” Over the past year, London Ambulance Service staff have treated 1,100 patients who have had or suspected a miscarriage.

In 2013, the London Ambulance Service established a specialist maternity team responsible for training ambulance crews, supporting call handlers and assessing incidents. The training was co-designed with parents who had lost a baby to support appropriate communication and remembrance.